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ROAMING REPORTER

By Hussein Rifath

With the 2024 Presidential Election due in a little more than a year from now, we wanted to learn more about students’ views on our political system and how connected they feel to the political process.



Seniors Adam Ayroso and Kyana Gordon


Adam Ayroso, Biology Major, B.S. M.D. program with SUNY Upstate Medical School


How do you get your information about who to vote for?

Adam: It could be something as simple as Google, if that's really what it is. I guess I would more so just watch the news, but making sure the news isn't too biased, like CNBC. Something where I can get a neutral picture of people that are running.


Do you vote in non-presidential elections?

Adam: Not really, no.


Do you find voting exciting at all?

Adam: I feel like it should be more exciting, but I guess maybe there's just not enough advertisement or marketing for the non-major elections, like presidential elections. I think those are exciting, just because of the tension that revolves around that. I feel like the smaller elections within your town or your county are important, too, because those are going to be the decisions that impact you more significantly when you think about it.


Do you vote based on party lines?

Adam: I tend to choose more Democratic.


Have you been giving serious thought to the upcoming presidential election?

Adam: Not yet, just because I feel like there hasn't been much. I mean, from what I experienced, there's not as much rumble about it yet. But once there is, I guess I will pay more attention to it, get informed and then make my decision.


Do you have any make-or-break political issues?

Adam: I guess more so just policies with gun control, maybe. Just because that's something that's a problem that's been prevalent among schools too.



Kyana Gordon, Senior, Biology


How do you get your information about who to vote for?

Kyana: I signed up for newsletter things. I get like an email or a text message saying what the Republican Party is doing or what the Democratic Party is doing at the moment because I hate watching the news. So I'd rather read it. Yeah, I don't know the name, but they always just say like ‘#go vote”. Turbo vote.


Do you vote at non presidential elections?

Kyana: Yeah. I like my local ones for the assemblyman. I'm in Elmont. And then I have ones for the school district that I live in. I also vote in those.


Do you find voting exciting?

Kyana: Yes, I do. That's mostly because like I only recently started voting of course. So there's still some shine. There's still some appeal. And I started with the 2020 election so it was really important and that was like my first introduction. I immigrated to the US and I recently got my citizenship.


Do you vote based on party lines?

Kyana: Yes. Definitely mostly Democratic, especially if I don't know who the person is.


Have you been thinking about the upcoming presidential election?

Kyana: Like all the time.


Do you have any make-or-break political issues?

Kyana: Definitely immigration because it's near and dear. Gun control is very important because we have school shootings and stuff like that. And nobody’s immune to it.





Cecilia Velesaca, Freshman, Nursing


How do you get your information about who to vote for?

Cecilia: Mainly social media platforms you're able to see. I know I've seen a couple of key highlights through debates and all of that and how they're presenting themselves. Sometimes I’ll get a glimpse when I see it on the news, like what they've been doing for the community to try and show themselves off. Something like that., TikTok, YouTube. Instagram as well.


So do you vote in non-presidential elections?

Cecilia: I haven't voted yet. I would. All of them.


Is voting exciting for you?

Cecilia: It's more anxiety just because of not knowing what the future will hold with these presidential candidates and stuff like that. Our presidential candidates sometimes just present themselves as like a popularity contest or like I want red, I want blue and that's it. Not really like for the people but just trying to look good for themselves.


Would you vote party line?

Cecilia: I would mix my vote [split the ticket].


Have you been thinking about the upcoming presidential election?

Cecilia: I have. Not too often just because I just turned 18 so [voting]’s not something that I have

been doing and it's also not as frequent, so it's not like something that's always

in my head. It'll signify how the next four years go for the country and for me. I will lose benefits, I'll gain benefits, maybe, stuff like that.


Do you have any make-or-break political issues?

Cecilia: Immigration laws, women's rights and stuff like that.




Sebastien Gourgoe, Freshman, Physics


How do you get your information about who to vote for?

Sebastien: Mainly, I just get the information from my youth, from my parents, pretty much what they think. I think too, because we pretty much live together. So if it's better for their living conditions, that they vote for somebody else who pretty much has their goals at heart, I would say, then I guess it's better for me, too.


Do you vote in non-presidential elections?

Sebastien: Yes, I voted before, last year. Whenever I can.


Is voting exciting for you?

Sebastien: No. I just know it’s something that I have to do.


Do you vote party line?

Sebastien: I just say the same as a party when I'm voting.


Have you been thinking about the upcoming presidential election?

Sebastien: Yeah. Just passes my mind here and there. If I'm being honest, and if I were to vote,

I don't really know who I would vote for.


Do you have any make-or-break political issues?

Sebastien: Right now, I just want something that's not going to end in disaster. That's pretty much it.

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